The Textile Museum Receives Federal Grant to Design Learning Center for New Museum at the George Washington University

Washington, D.C.—The Textile Museum is pleased to announce that it has received a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services’s FY2013 Museums for America program. The competitive matching grant award of $88,364 will support the design of an interactive learning center for the museum’s new location opening in fall 2014 on the campus of the George Washington University (GW). The learning center will introduce audiences of all ages to the techniques and materials used to create textiles, as well as the cultures that make and use textiles around the globe.

Members of the museum’s education, curatorial, and exhibitions teams are working with an advisory group that includes museum volunteers and GW faculty to design the learning center. Graduate students in GW’s museum education program will contribute to the design and evaluation phases of the project.

Interactive stations in the learning center will help demystify the process of creating textiles, connect historical textiles with our contemporary world, and explore textiles as windows into diverse cultures around the globe. A combination of “high touch” and “high tech” experiences will encourage visitors to examine textiles’ rich connections with world cultures, history, economics, mathematics, and other fields.

“As The Textile Museum prepares to move to its new home, we are honored to receive a grant to support a learning center display that will provide public and university audiences an opportunity to explore the technical, artistic, and cultural aspects of textiles, and perhaps more importantly, to better understand the diverse global cultures from which they come,” said Dr. John Wetenhall, director of The Textile Museum and the new George Washington University Museum. “Collaborating with GW graduate students and faculty in the learning center’s development also presents a valuable training experience for the next generation of museum educators and exhibit designers.”

The project seeks to re-envision an existing learning center developed fifteen years ago for The Textile Museum’s historic buildings in Washington’s Dupont-Kalorama neighborhood. In the fall of 2014, The Textile Museum will reopen at GW in new museum facilities that will include dedicated galleries and increased exhibition space for The Textile Museum and the university’s Albert H. Small Washingtoniana Collection. The learning center is among the exhibitions and programs that will involve GW faculty and students in new academic collaborations.

The Textile Museum is one of 170 grant projects funded among a pool of 597 applications to the FY2013 Museums for America program. Institute of Museum and Library Services Director Susan Hildreth honored the grantees at a ceremony on Capitol Hill on September 18.

About The Textile Museum and the George Washington University
The Textile Museum will reopen in a forthcoming museum on the campus of the George Washington University in the fall of 2014. Exhibitions and programs will be presented to the public through this unprecedented affiliation between a university and an existing art museum with a respected eighty-eight-year history. The Textile Museum plans to continue many of its acclaimed programs, and the affiliation creates new opportunities for research and innovative public resources.

The new museum will be a custom-built, approximately 46,000-square-foot building located at G and 21st streets, NW. It will include dedicated galleries and increased exhibition space for The Textile Museum, the Albert H. Small Washingtoniana Collection and the university’s art collections. A groundbreaking ceremony was held in October 2012, substantial construction work will be completed on the facilities in spring 2014, and the public opening is anticipated for fall 2014.

In addition to the new museum in Foggy Bottom, the university is constructing a 22,000-square-foot conservation and collections resource center at its Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Va., for the care and study of the museum’s collections. Textile Museum staff are currently preparing the 19,000 pieces in the museum’s collections for the move to the new storage facility, a process which is being documented on the museum’s tumblr page: http://textile-museum.tumblr.com/

About The Textile Museum 

The Textile Museum expands public knowledge and appreciation—locally, nationally and internationally—of the artistic merit and cultural importance of the world’s textiles. Founded in 1925 by George Hewitt Myers, The Textile Museum is an international center for the exhibition, study, collection and preservation of the textile arts. The Textile Museum collections encompass more than 19,000 objects that date from 3,000 BCE to the present. The museum’s 20,000 volume Arthur D. Jenkins Library of Textile Arts is among the world’s foremost resources for the study of textiles. The Textile Museum is located at 2320 ‘S’ Street, NW in Washington, D.C. The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. through October 13, 2013. An $8 suggested admission is requested of non-members. Visitors will be still be able to visit The Textile Museum Shop and the two historic homes of the museum’s founder, George Hewitt Myers, on Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., October 14 to December 31, 2013. In the fall of 2014, The Textile Museum will reopen as a primary cornerstone of the forthcoming George Washington University Museum (G and 21st Streets NW). For more information, visit http://www.gwu.edu/museum/ or http://textilemuseum.org/tmatgw/.

About the Institute of Museum and Library Services
The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums. to advance innovation, lifelong learning, and cultural and civic engagement. Our grant making, policy development, and research help libraries and museums deliver valuable services that make it possible for communities and individuals to thrive. To learn more, visit www.imls.gov and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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Download a press release [PDF]

Contact: Chita Middleton, Communications and Marketing Associate, (202) 667-0441, ext. 78 or cmiddleton@textilemuseum.org

Textile Museum to Display Advocacy Quilts, Nov 15–Dec 1

This special showing of eight narrative quilts from “Advocacy Quilts: A Voice for the Voiceless” will offer vivid windows into the lives of women in marginalized communities across the globe, from Congo and Kosovo, to Belize and Bangladesh. While many of the artists tell of traumatic experiences, including wartime violence and debilitating health issues, others celebrate local arts and customs, and depict the economic benefits of microcredit programs for women. These quilts also unite women across cultures: the individual panels created worldwide were assembled into finished works by quilters in the United States as an act of solidarity.

Visit The Textile Museum’s Myers Room between November 15 and December 1, 2013 to see eight Advocacy Quilts on loan from The Advocacy Project, a non-profit based in Washington, D.C., which sends graduate students to volunteer in marginalized communities around the world. For more information about the Advocacy Quilts visit http://advocacynet.org/page/advocacyquilting.

For more information, contact Chita Middleton, Communications and Marketing Associate at cmiddleton@textilemuseum.org or (202) 667-0441, ext. 78.

Belize quilt

The Belize Orchids Quilt (detail), Belize, 2012. Courtesy of The Advocacy Project.

The Textile Museum Shop Will Be Open For Holiday Shopping

Felt necklace from Nepal

Felt necklace – Nepal
($16)

Washington D.C.—Consistently voted one of D.C.’s best museum gift stores, The Textile Museum Shop will be open throughout the 2013 holiday shopping season. Visit Fridays through Sundays this fall to find one-of-a-kind, handmade gifts from the Washington, D.C. area and around the world. Beginning October 14, The Textile Museum will be closed to visitors Mondays through Thursdays as it prepares to transition to the George Washington University.

The TM Shop has received top ratings from Apartment Therapy, Frommer’s, and other guides for its wide selection of high-quality jewelry, scarves, home décor, and more. Visitors to the shop this season will discover unique pieces for every style and budget: a cozy alpaca “infinity scarf” handmade in North Carolina; a felted fair-trade necklace from Nepal; and colorful pillows quilted by local fiber-artist Cynthia Gossage—to name a few.

Alpaca scarf from North Carolina

Alpaca scarf – North Carolina
($39)

Holiday shopping will kick-off October 1 with an unveiling of new winter merchandise, including alpaca, felt, and wool accessories, throws, and slippers. Festive shop events and promotions will continue throughout the season; visit the online calendar for details. Between December 13 and 29, the museum store is offering discounts up to 70% as it prepares to move to the new museum on GW’s campus. The Textile Museum’s final exhibition before its 2014 reopening, Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains, closes October 13. Beginning October 14, the museum and shop will reduce public hours. Guests will be still be able to visit The TM Shop and the two historic homes of the museum’s founder, George Hewitt Myers, on Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., October 14 to December 31.

The TM Shop’s fall hours will give visitors a special opportunity to enjoy the museum’s last days on S Street, while obtaining unique holiday gifts for friends and family. A gift from The TM Shop is a also gift to The Textile Museum, helping support its mission to expand public knowledge and appreciation—locally, nationally, and internationally—of the artistic merits and cultural importance of the world’s textiles.

About The Textile Museum and the George Washington University

The Textile Museum will reopen in a forthcoming museum on the campus of the George Washington University in the fall of 2014. Exhibitions and programs will be presented to the public through this unprecedented affiliation between a university and an existing art museum with a respected 88-year history. The Textile Museum plans to continue many of its acclaimed programs, and the affiliation creates new opportunities for research and innovative public resources.

The new museum will be a custom-built, approximately 46,000-square-foot building located at G and 21st Streets, NW. It will include dedicated galleries and increased exhibition space for The Textile Museum, the Albert H. Small Washingtoniana Collection and the university’s art collections. A groundbreaking ceremony was held in October 2012, substantial construction work will be completed on the facilities in December 2013, and the public opening is anticipated for fall 2014.

In addition to the new museum in Foggy Bottom, the university is constructing a 22,000-square-foot conservation and resource center at its Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Va., for the care and study of the museum’s collections. Textile Museum staff are currently preparing the 19,000 pieces in the museum’s collection for the move to the new storage facility, a process which is being documented on the museum’s tumblr page: http://textile-museum.tumblr.com/

About The Textile Museum

The Textile Museum expands public knowledge and appreciation—locally, nationally and internationally—of the artistic merit and cultural importance of the world’s textiles. Founded in 1925 by George Hewitt Myers, The Textile Museum is an international center for the exhibition, study, collection and preservation of the textile arts. The Textile Museum collection encompasses more than 19,000 objects that date from 3,000 BCE to the present. The museum’s 20,000 volume Arthur D. Jenkins Library of Textile Arts is among the world’s foremost resources for the study of textiles. The Textile Museum is located at 2320 ‘S’ Street, NW in Washington, D.C. The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. through October 13, 2013. An $8 suggested admission is requested of non-members. In the fall of 2014, The Textile Museum will reopen as a primary cornerstone of the forthcoming George Washington University Museum (G and 21st Streets NW). For more information, visit http://www.gwu.edu/museum/ or http://textilemuseum.org/tmatgw/.

Please Note: Beginning October 14, 2013, The Textile Museum will not have an exhibition on view. The Textile Museum Shop will remain open Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from October 14 through December 31, 2013. The Textile Museum will offer a variety of special events and programs throughout the transition in 2013 and 2014. Visit http://www.textilemuseum.org/calendar/ for the most up-to-date list of events.

Download a press release [PDF]

Download a holiday product preview [PDF]

Download a list of shop events [PDF]

John Wetenhall Appointed Director of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum

Washington, D.C.— John Wetenhall was appointed director of the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum today. In this capacity, he will lead the development of the forthcoming university museum as well as transition The Textile Museum to the GW campus in fall 2014. Dr. Wetenhall will begin on June 1 and also will hold the appointment of associate professor of museum studies.

John Wetenhall

John Wetenhall

“John Wetenhall will take the lead in shaping a new kind of museum for GW. This is a one-of-a-kind partnership and we are confident that he will create a cultural destination that will be a leader in academic and cultural communities in D.C. and around the world,” said Steven Lerman, provost and executive vice president of academic affairs for George Washington. “His accomplishments in both the academic and artistic fields make him the ideal person to connect the strong traditions of scholarship and art in the new museum.”

Dr. Wetenhall, a highly regarded leader in the museum field, was named director following a ten-month national and international search by representatives of the George Washington University and The Textile Museum. He previously served in executive leadership roles at the Carnegie Museums in Pittsburgh; The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, Fla.; and the Cheekwood Museum of Art in Nashville. Dr. Wetenhall is an experienced fundraiser having directed multi-million dollar capital campaign projects.  His experience extends to four major museum building projects, with such architects and firms as Edward Larrabee Barnes, Graham Gund, Herzog & DeMeuron and HOK.

“John Wetenhall has the background to blend business and art, which are key needs for 21st-century museums,” said Bruce P. Baganz, president of The Textile Museum Board of Trustees. “With his broad experience in the museum field, tremendous stature and entrepreneurial approach, we are positive that John will steer the new museum into an era that takes full advantage of the artistic, cultural, academic and technological assets that this partnership provides. His experience in successfully transitioning The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art to Florida State University is a testament to his ability to introduce the key strengths of The Textile Museum to the campus community.”

The new museum at GW will include dedicated galleries and increased exhibition space for The Textile Museum, the Albert H. Small Washingtoniana Collection and the university’s art collections. Exhibitions and programs will be presented to the public and will involve GW faculty and students in academic collaborations.

“The Textile Museum is internationally respected for its global collection, important exhibitions and scholarly publications.  The George Washington University is renowned for its outstanding programs in museum studies and museum education, as well as its rich collection documenting the nation’s capital,” said Dr. Wetenhall.  “The new museum creates at once a campus laboratory for museum training and innovation, while also presenting important art and historical artifacts of profound importance to both Washington, D.C. and the world. This is a magnificent professional opportunity and a chance to contribute meaningfully to the museum field.”

Dr. Wetenhall serves as vice chair and treasurer of the American Alliance of Museums (AAM) and chairs nominations for the U.S. National Committee of the International Council of Museums (ICOM-US).  In 2010, Dr. Wetenhall received the Museum Service Award from the Southeastern Museums Conference (SEMC) and the Florida Association of Museums’ (FAM) Lifetime Achievement Award.

He received a Ph.D. from Stanford University; an M.B.A. from Vanderbilt University; a master’s degree from Williams College; and a bachelor’s degree from Dartmouth College. In addition to being a talented administrator, Dr. Wetenhall has served as a curator of European, American and contemporary art, and, as an art historian, has taught at Stanford University, Santa Clara University and the University of Minnesota.  He also has taught graduate courses in museum management and has been a featured speaker at numerous professional conferences.

“As a longtime admirer of Albert Small’s Washingtoniana Collection and as a proponent for the new museum, I am thrilled to have someone of Dr. Wetenhall’s caliber as its director,” said Robert Perry, a member of George Washington’s Board of Trustees and a participant on the search committee.  “This is a rare opportunity to have a D.C. museum on a university campus that will tell the story of the founding of our nation’s capital and that will be a destination museum for scholars, students and the public.”

Once at GW, the acclaimed programs and exhibitions involving The Textile Museum collection will continue, augmented by new opportunities for research and public engagement. The new museum will showcase The Textile Museum’s internationally-recognized collections of more than 19,000 pieces, which encompass the textile arts of peoples across the Near East, Central Asia, East and Southeast Asia, Africa and the indigenous cultures of the Americas. The 20,000-volume Arthur D. Jenkins Library of Textile Arts also will be housed in the new museum on GW’s Foggy Bottom campus. The Textile Museum exhibition “Out of Southeast Asia: Art that Sustains,” opening this Friday, April 12 and on view through October 13, 2013, is the final exhibition in the current museum building.

The university and The Textile Museum held a groundbreaking for the new museum in October 2012. The museum will be a custom-built building located at G and 21st streets, NW, and is expected to be completed by fall 2014.  A conservation and collections resource center at GW’s Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Va. also is under construction and will be completed in late 2013.

Contacts: Katy Clune, Communications and Marketing Manager, The Textile Museum, (202) 667-0441, ext. 77 or kclune@textilemuseum.org
Angela Olson, Media Relations Specialist, The George Washington University, (202) 994-3087, olsona@gwu.edu

Download a press release [PDF]

More information

 

The Textile Museum to Change Hours in 2013

Exhibitions Open through October 13, Programs and Museum Shop Open All Year

Washington, D.C.— The final exhibition at The Textile Museum before its 2014 reopening at the George Washington University will open on April 12, 2013. After the exhibition closes on October 13, 2013, The Textile Museum will reduce its current public hours. Visitors will still be able to visit the acclaimed Textile Museum Shop and the two historic homes of the museum’s founder, George Hewitt Myers, on Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., October 14 to December 31. After October 14, The Textile Museum will be closed to visitors Mondays through Thursdays to prepare for the upcoming move. The museum will offer programs and special events at its S Street location throughout 2013. In addition, the museum’s popular event rental program will continue throughout the year.

The upcoming exhibition, “Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains,” (April 12 through October 13), will feature the work of Carol Cassidy, the husband-wife team Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam, Vernal Bogren Swift and historical textiles from the museum’s collections. By pairing recent artworks with 16 treasures from the museum’s collections, “Out of Southeast Asia” asserts the beauty of the region’s textiles and demonstrates how contemporary makers help to preserve these art forms even as they interpret them in new and innovative ways. As The Textile Museum prepares to move to its new location, “Out of Southeast Asia: Art that Sustains” provides a fitting visual link between the past, present and future while demonstrating the continued relevance of traditional textiles.

The Arthur D. Jenkins Library of Textile Arts, one of the world’s foremost resources for the study of the textile arts, will be open by appointment only beginning October 14, 2013. This non-circulating, 20,000-volume library will reopen to the public in the new museum facility on the campus of the George Washington University.

About The Textile Museum and the George Washington University

The Textile Museum will reopen in a forthcoming museum on the campus of the George Washington University in the fall of 2014. Exhibitions and programs will be presented to the public through this unprecedented affiliation between a university and an existing art museum with a respected 88-year history. The Textile Museum plans to continue many of its acclaimed programs, and the affiliation creates new opportunities for research and innovative public resources.

The new museum will be a custom-built, approximately 46,000-square-foot building located at G and 21st Streets, NW. It will include dedicated galleries and increased exhibition space for The Textile Museum, the Albert H. Small Washingtoniana Collection and the university’s art collections. A groundbreaking ceremony was held in October 2012, substantial construction work will be completed on the facilities in December 2013, and the public opening is anticipated for fall 2014.

In addition to the new museum in Foggy Bottom, the university will construct a 22,000-square-foot conservation and resource center at its Virginia Science and Technology Campus in Ashburn, Va., for the care and study of the museum’s collections. Textile Museum staff are currently preparing the 19,000 pieces in the museum’s collection for the move to the new storage facility, a process which is being documented on the museum’s tumblr page: http://textile-museum.tumblr.com/ 

About The Textile Museum

The Textile Museum expands public knowledge and appreciation—locally, nationally and internationally—of the artistic merit and cultural importance of the world’s textiles. Founded in 1925 by George Hewitt Myers, The Textile Museum is an international center for the exhibition, study, collection and preservation of the textile arts. The Textile Museum collection encompasses more than 19,000 objects that date from 3,000 BCE to the present. The museum’s 20,000 volume Arthur D. Jenkins Library of Textile Arts is among the world’s foremost resources for the study of textiles. The Textile Museum is located at 2320 ‘S’ Street, NW in Washington, D.C. The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. through October 13, 2013. An $8 suggested admission is requested of non-members. In the fall of 2014, The Textile Museum will reopen as a primary cornerstone of the forthcoming George Washington University Museum (G and 21st Streets NW). For more information, visit www.gwu.edu/textilemuseum or http://textilemuseum.org/tmatgw/.

Please Note: Beginning October 14, 2013, The Textile Museum will not have an exhibition on view. The Textile Museum Shop will remain open Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from October 14 through December 31, 2013. The Textile Museum will offer a variety of special events and programs throughout the transition in 2013 and 2014. Visit http://www.textilemuseum.org/calendar/ for the most up-to-date list of events.

Download a press release [PDF]

High-resolution images

Contact: Katy Clune, Communications and Marketing Manager, (202) 667-0441, ext. 77 or kclune(at)textilemuseum.org

“Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains” Final Exhibition on S Street Showcases Four Contemporary Artists

Verna Bogren Swift Garden of Earthquakes

Vernal Bogren Swift, A Garden of Earthquakes (detail), 2007–08. Collection of the artist.

The final exhibition at The Textile Museum before its 2014 reopening will showcase the textile traditions of Southeast Asia and demonstrate how four contemporary artists integrate the best of the past into new works. “Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains,” (April 12 through October 13, 2013), features the work of Carol Cassidy, the husband-wife team Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam, and Vernal Bogren Swift. The exhibition centers on Indonesia and Laos, but takes up a question faced by nations around the world: How can long-inherited art forms be carried forward in meaningful ways by future generations? By pairing recent artworks with 16 treasures from the museum’s collections, “Out of Southeast Asia” asserts the beauty of these traditional textiles and demonstrates how contemporary makers help to preserve these art forms even as they interpret them in new and innovative ways.

“Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains” is the final exhibition The Textile Museum will present in its historic S Street buildings as it prepares to reopen in 2014 as a cornerstone of the forthcoming George Washington University Museum. Beginning October 14, 2013, The Textile Museum Shop will be open Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., through December 31, 2013. Programs and special events will be offered throughout the transition; visit the museum’s calendar online for the most up-to-date schedule.

As The Textile Museum prepares to move to its new location, “Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains” provides a fitting visual link between the past, present and future while demonstrating the continued relevance of traditional textiles. In addition to precious examples of handmade batik from Indonesia, the ethnic weaving of northeast Laos presents exotic new forms rarely seen in this country. “Out of Southeast Asia” extols how these textiles—both familiar and not—inspire today’s creations.

Carol Cassidy

“Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains” includes six hangings, scarves and upscale upholstery by artist Carol Cassidy. While her works employ traditional Lao motifs, Cassidy often increases their scale and uses a simple color palette, resulting in panels with a distinctly contemporary feel. The artist first visited Laos in 1989, while serving as an advisor to a United Nations weaving project. While there, Cassidy chose to stay and establish her own weaving enterprise with the mission to preserve local skills and techniques. In the following 20 years, Cassidy’s studio has grown into a professional, large-scale commercial business, while staying true to the designs and idiosyncrasies that define Laos’s weaving. Lao Textiles, the enterprise Cassidy established in Vientiane in 1990, was awarded the Product Excellence Award by UNESCO in 2001. In 2002, Cassidy received the Preservation of Craft award from Aid to Artisans. Today, Cassidy’s studio produces artistic textiles and upscale upholstery used by designers in Paris, London and New York, and the success of her enterprise has resulted in a resurgence of local weaving.

Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam, Father Sky Mother Earth

Agus Ismoyo and Nia Fliam, Father Sky Mother Earth (Bapak Langit Ibu Bumi) (Back), 2005. On loan from Margrit Benton and Mark Nelson.

Nia Fliam and Agus Ismoyo

Artists Nia Fliam and Agus Ismoyo are primarily interested in Indonesian batik (wax-resist patterned cloth). Seen on countless beach wraps and home-décor items today, batik was perfected in the courts of Java, where certain motifs were considered powerful in both political and spiritual terms. In 2009, UNESCO added batik to its list of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity. Today, commercial batik production is mechanized, leaving it to artists such as the Ismoyos to perpetuate the spirit of this centuries-old art. As demonstrated in the seven complex, colorful silk hangings on view in “Out of Southeast Asia,” Fliam and Ismoyo employ batik’s motifs and techniques in entirely new ways. Their effort to bring traditional imagery into the 21st century also extends past Indonesia—the artists frequently speak of an interest in finding “the DNA of our world culture” through exploring commonalities between ancient art forms. Following this interest, the artists have partnered with indigenous communities around the world, and the exhibition includes a collaboration with aboriginal Australian artists. “Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains” also includes the sculpture “Tree of Life VIII (Pohon Hayati VIII),” a 3D tribute to a design used by cultures around the world.


Vernal Bogren Swift

“Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains” is the Washington, D.C. debut for Vernal Bogren Swift. The finest Indonesian batiks employ patterns—both bold and minute—across the entire surface. Swift integrates this aesthetic into her storybook-like illustrations of myths, legends and old wives tales—drawn from her extensive travels and the strong oral history tradition present on Haida Gwaii (British Columbia, Canada), where she currently lives. Originally from Kansas, Swift taught herself batik more than 40 years ago. Intrigued by the medium’s emphasis on small patterns, Swift traveled to Indonesia to learn traditional batik. Recently, she has developed means to use more natural dyes (such as pomegranate) in her practice. The works on view in “Out of Southeast Asia” are typical of Swift’s style, which pushes batik patterning into new applications. The three large triptychs on view take up magical subjects: “Early Lessons and Lies,” “A Garden of Earthquakes” and “Moons under Sea.”

About the Exhibition

“Out of Southeast Asia: Art That Sustains” is curated by Dr. Mattiebelle Gittinger, one of the foremost researchers and scholars in the field of Southeast Asian textiles. Gittinger received her PhD from Columbia University in 1972. Since the 1970s, she has conducted extensive fieldwork across Southeast Asia, India, Myanmar (Burma), Europe and the Middle East. During her 38 years at The Textile Museum, Gittinger has organized several important exhibitions, each accompanied by a highly-regarded catalog. “Out of Southeast Asia: Art that Sustains” is made possible in part through grants from the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation and the Asian Cultural Council. 

About The Textile Museum

The Textile Museum expands public knowledge and appreciation—locally, nationally and internationally—of the artistic merit and cultural importance of the world’s textiles. Founded in 1925 by George Hewitt Myers, The Textile Museum is an international center for the exhibition, study, collection and preservation of the textile arts. The Textile Museum collection encompasses more than 19,000 objects that date from 3,000 BCE to the present. The museum’s 20,000 volume Arthur D. Jenkins Library of Textile Arts is among the world’s foremost resources for the study of textiles. The Textile Museum is located at 2320 ‘S’ Street, NW in Washington, D.C. The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. through October 13, 2013. An $8 suggested admission is requested of non-members. In the fall of 2014, The Textile Museum will reopen as a primary cornerstone of the forthcoming George Washington University Museum (G and 21st Streets NW). For more information, visit www.gwu.edu/textilemuseum or http://textilemuseum.org/tmatgw/.

Please Note: Beginning October 14, 2013, The Textile Museum will not have an exhibition on view. The Textile Museum Shop will remain open Fridays through Sundays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from October 14 through December 31, 2013. The Textile Museum will offer a variety of special events and programs throughout the transition in 2013 and 2014. Visit http://www.textilemuseum.org/calendar/ for the most up-to-date list of events.

PRESS PREVIEW: Wednesday, April 10, 9:30 a.m. Join us for a curator-led tour of the exhibition and the opportunity to learn more about The Textile Museum’s move in 2014. RSVP to kclune@textilemuseum.org.

IMAGES: Preview high-resolution images (PDF). To request print-ready files, email info@textilemuseum.org.

DOWNLOAD A PRESS RELEASE

The Textile Museum Shop is Ready for the Holiday Season

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Oya Crochet Earrings ($29.95)

The Textile Museum Shop is ready for the holiday season, and is the perfect place to buy one-of-a-kind gifts. 

Voted one of the best museum shops in Washington, D.C. by both Frommer’s and Apartment Therapy, the shop carries beautiful gifts in every price range, from embroidered bags, to silk scarves, to unique housewares. For the indecisive, gift certificates are also available.

In keeping with the current exhibition The Sultan’s Garden: The Blossoming of Ottoman Art, visitors will find plenty of floral patterns and handmade items from Turkey and its surrounding countries.  The catalog for that exhibition is also available for sale, and makes an excellent gift for any textile enthusiast.

One of the shop’s most popular annual events, The Member VIP Shopping Weekend, will be December 7-9.  Members get a 25% discount on all purchases (members receive a 10% discount the rest of the year) both in the shop and online.

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Twoolie knit animals – Mexico ($18)

The shop is open to the public during regular museum hours (Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 1-5 p.m.) as well as during after-hours programs such as special lectures and events.  And The Textile Museum Shop is open 24/7 on the web at textilemuseumshop.org.

Proceeds from shop sales support the museum and allow it to continue its mission to expand public knowledge and appreciation – locally, nationally, and internationally – of the artistic merits and cultural importance of the world’s textiles.

 
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